31 day Challenge Day 5

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hippie

Ten songs you love right now?

This is going to be the toughest assignment! Why? because I don’t like music? No, I love listening to music. The problem is that as I don’t partake of TV or radio my contemporary music exposure tends to be an occasional face book post from my kids etc. Add to this I generally listen to Christian music (encouraging with all the bad stuff right now) 60-70’s songs or classical and with my non-existent memory and IT lacks I frequently don’t remember the artist or even titles of songs. So enough with the excuses! I’ll try to come up with 10 songs.

  • “Mary Did You Know” by Pentatonix (the guys who make the musical accompaniment verbally – amazing! and they bring a new one out every Christmas.)
  • “California Dreaming” by Mamas and Papas (great for drab, rainy, English winter like now – of course I’m not visualizing California but all those sunny places I’ve lived.)
  • “Nights in White Satin” by Moody Blues (beautiful dreamy old song that brings back 100 memories.)
  • “Born to be Wild” by Steppenwolf (the rush of the road and the past energy of youth overwhelm me again every time I hear it.)
  • “Carry On” by Crosby Stills and Nash (Memories of when hope was new and fresh and world peace seemed attainable – if you are wondering “why so many hippie type songs?” my son in law downloaded a bunch for me at Christmas – I was surprised to find he liked them too.)
  • “Blowing in the Wind” by Bob Dylan.
  • “Where Have all the Flowers Gone” Joan Bias (Two classic anti-war songs that can still tear me up.)

After two sad songs gonna cheat a bit here for 8-10 and add some real “feel good” music from Abba with the “Mamma Mai” songs (I love them all and listen again and again but don’t know most titles.)

Can I get a pass please teacher? Please? pretty please?

The 60’s (Both of Them!)

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The 60’s brought cataclysmic changes into my life. It was the time I ceased to try vainly to adhere to the “norms” to conform to be accepted, and began to live the life of that strange and wonderful person – myself. It spanned from my first grown up movie (the Beatles “hard Day’s Night”) watched with my mum as I was too young to go alone, to my entering into the fabulous new world of fine art and college degrees.
It entailed much smashing of stereotyped barriers (poor girls from council estates didn’t do that stuff) discovering and exploring whole new worlds of endless breathtaking vision formerly concealed from my eyes. It was a time of freedom, adventure, learning, and above all discovering others like myself.

Now all of that is long, long ago. I have entered another kind of “60’s” a time when my “batteries” don’t recharge like they used to, when even in retirement I have to pace myself. Once again the questions come. How do I want to invest the time remaining to me here?
Wild adventures no longer have the same appeal, besides I’ve done that. Yet, though my body has aged (and frequently reminds me of my limitations), my heart and spirit remain the same, looking for new challenges, new creations, wanting to wring the best from each day, to learn, to explore, to interact.
This is a new time of re evaluation, another new beginning.

The 60’s (Both of Them!)
The 60’s brought cataclysmic changes into my life. It was the time I ceased to try vainly to adhere to the “norms” to conform to be accepted, and began to live the life of that strange and wonderful person – myself. It spanned from my first grown up movie (the Beatles “hard Day’s Night”) watched with my mum as I was too young to go alone, to my entering into the fabulous new world of fine art and college degrees.
It entailed much smashing of stereotyped barriers (poor girls from council estates didn’t do that stuff) discovering and exploring whole new worlds of endless breathtaking vision formerly concealed from my eyes. It was a time of freedom, adventure, learning, and above all discovering others like myself.

Now all of that is long, long ago. I have entered another kind of “60’s” a time when my “batteries” don’t recharge like they used to, when even in retirement I have to pace myself. Once again the questions come. How do I want to invest the time remaining to me here?
Wild adventures no longer have the same appeal, besides I’ve done that. Yet, though my body has aged (and frequently reminds me of my limitations), my heart and spirit remain the same, looking for new challenges, new creations, wanting to wring the best from each day, to learn, to explore, to interact.
This is a new time of re evaluation, another new beginning.