Learning freedoms we so often lack.

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The wind is gusting the sails, fighting for control of our small vessel. My “special” companion works the tiller, proving surprisingly adept as he carries on a soliloquy of “Can you paint with all the colours of the wind?”

We laugh and squeal as it takes us twirling to circle round, and try again to tack, we have to yield; you cannot win a battle with the wind!

He talks about Deadpool (his obsession) asks what I’d do if I saw him coming towards us in a boat full of guns. He tries out his humour on me. I love the freedom of these “special sailors”, they never pretend, they just “are”. Though each disabled in some way they share a bond of freedom we so often lack.

I’ve always felt I could learn from everyone I encountered in life, but did I leave these out, the autistic, mongoloid, mentally handicapped, disabled?

Now I begin to understand. They have so much to teach me, of freedom, of simple joy, of appreciation, of love.

I love the sun on the water, the rush of the wind as it lifts the boat, and I love spending time with these pure ones.

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I’m so happy today!

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Today I woke up beaming sunshine! Why? (apart from this beautiful sunny day).

One of my younger daughters told me she’s chosen to become a mechanic and has already been accepted for the college and practical training. You may find this odd but it makes so much sense.

Like her I chose a man type major (sculpture rather than painting). Not only that but she was our family handyman since her brother moved on (and very good at it too).

But there’s another reason why it’s such a wise move, you see they have an autistic child which (though the Danish system is extremely supportive) can be immensely stressful.

What could be more therapeutic than working with machines were every problem has a reason and a solution. I saw it straight away. She is one smart girl!

If we looked deeper.

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This was posted by one of my daughters who has an autistic child. Of all my “high flying” children I am most proud of her!

I know one of her greatest trails was the reaction of folks around thinking (or even saying) “Why doesn’t she shut that kid up!” not realizing he had a genuine problem (he looks like an angel – a normal angel!). She said sometimes she felt like hanging a sign around her neck saying “Give us a break he’s autistic”.

Now years later thanks to her love and sacrifice he has made tremendous progress he can talk, interact, love. Now the world is no longer the strange and upsetting place it once was to him. But how much pain could have been avoided had those around had more understanding.

God help us not to judge when we don’t have all the facts.