True Brotherhood.

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(from July 2014

Song Bird Songs

kurds

This true story began many years ago. A friend while traveling with his family in Greece had come across a Kurdish refugee camp. There were 600 refugees and four water taps, garbage was everywhere and there was little or no organisation. Worst of all there was no doctor or clinic – some arrived with gunshot wounds and stories of atrocities abounded…

He was not a doctor, just a male nurse, but he couldn’t ignore their plight. Holiday adventure forgotten they stayed on to help making a tenuous living singing in restaurants over the weekends (he had a great voice). His pregnant wife had just had a baby and with two other small children they needed help urgently. That’s why we went.

The day I entered the city of squalid tents the Greek authorities decided to move the whole embarrassing populace out of the camp. It had been allocated in winter…

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Nepalese Faith.

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james

This effected me profoundly because it was posted by my Nepalese friend living and helping in the affected areas. The previous day’s post had told how they’d been returning from distributing aid in one of the worse affected villages when the second big quake rocked their bus. It must have been hugely discouraging.

I know he’s living in a tent as his home was damaged, I know some of his family’s homes are too badly damaged to repair, but I also know some of the orphans he gave his life to bringing up are likewise out helping others.

I cannot help but applaud the faith and courage of the Nepalese people. I wonder if my own would withstand such a storm.

Sometimes I’m so thankful for face book!

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nepal

You see the first I heard about the earthquake in Nepal was that my old friend was safe – a face book announcement.

He was in an affected area and this is a photo from his page.

Such folks are rare and I’m so relieved he and the children are OK. Many years ago he took over a small group of orphans after foreign aid workers were forced to leave (he’s Nepalese) and has devoted his life to bringing them up (they are young teenagers now).

You can see his heart by this quote from his face book page:

“All my Nepali Facebook friends, please make a list of worst effected people you know of and inbox me and I will do what I can to help. I will add to my list I already have over 50 families in my list.
Don’t tell me here, either call me or inbox me. Thanks! You can also tell me what is the greatest need right now. I might not be able to help everyone but I will try to do what I can and however many I can help.”

I might add he, himself is living in a tent since his home was damaged and only going back inside to access the internet (which appears to be working). They have had 96 aftershocks there so such trips are dangerous!

I later heard my other friend in the area – an equally committed English lady – was safe also.

I have been through several earthquakes both in Japan and Taiwan (some major) it’s hard to explain the confusion and disorientation that hits when the ground shifts under your feet, seconds seem like lifetimes.

You can see why my heart leapt to know they were OK. Such folks are too precious to loose.

A Deep Truth From a Man I Greatly Admire.

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hope

One thing that sustains me when I hear of these great calamities is the fact that they always trigger incredible caring from other human beings. Just when you wonder why, amid such senseless suffering, people would still have hope, hundreds of selfless volunteers pour into those regions.

Hope appears even in the worst of times to give us proof of God’s presence.—Nick Vujicic