Enjoying freedom.

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Today is the second day of being “boot free”! (I slipped and had to wear a surgical boot for two weeks). I’m reveling in simple things I took for granted for example:
1) Being able to ride my bike again – mobility!
2)Taking a shower minus the delicate, chair assisted, operation of getting into the bath tub without putting weight on my injured ankle.
3) Going up and down my banister-less stairs easily (crawling and bumping on my bum is so undignified lol!)
4) Starting to get back to normal walking speed instead of snail pace.
5) Not having to plan my life to the tiny detail. If I left something upstairs for example it was a big deal to go get it.
6) Not having to strap on “the boot” if I need to go bathroom in the night (takes a while by which time you are well awake.)

Some things I’m still working on – running, going downstairs normally (still doing a sideways shuffle for safety), and being able to fit both feet into my tennies again. Thankfully it healed amazingly fast with very little pain.
The biggest thing I was most thankful for, (and which I constantly reminded myself of) is that it was only very temporary. I bow to those heroes and heroines that bare with such things (or worse) on a permanent basis and manage to keep a cheery smile. I’ve many times helped those with crutches, leg supports even wheelchairs onto the boats so they could go sailing, but now I have even more understanding of just how frightening it must be trying to get down into that boat.I applaud their courage!

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Unbelievable! (Update on my injury).

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The orthopedic surgeon I was referred to for further treatment phoned to say they couldn’t find a fracture on my x-rays (weird because they showed the chipped sections to my daughter)so I wouldn’t need to come for further treatment as it was only a soft tissue injury after all.
Hearing that there was no longer any pain or swelling she encouraged me to try to start to walk on it again (keeping the boot for support)to prevent it getting stiff.
I’m now hobbling (due to the boot)around on it without even needing the crutches and still totally pain free, in fact it feels pretty much like normal(I’m going to go slow though.)
Many thanks to those who prayed for it, this surely is not “normal”. It sure felt like a break when it happened(I’m not the fainting type and thought I’d pass out or throw up with the pain) but even a bad sprain couldn’t heal so quickly!
My heart is full of joy!

My new accessories!

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Sadly a minor slip on the stairs means two weeks of a boot and crutches due to two chipped bones and possible ligament injury. At first I thought it must be broken as the pain was excruciating, I was in shock and felt like throwing up.To even move it was agony.
Things I’m thankful for:
1)It’s just a chip not a break.
2) My daughter was dropping my grandson (he usually comes to my door alone)and coped with wonderful calm and efficiency.
3) After sending prayer request messages in the car the pain dramatically eased before I got to the hospital and I could move the toes again.
We managed to fit the hospital stuff in before my daughter had to leave for a vital board meeting (just ran over 5 mins.)so she was able to drive me home.
4) I’d just done my weekly shopping.
5) I hadn’t yet put my office chair in the garage as planned (it has wheels)
6) Two of my daughters came to cook for me (due to a prior arrangement to meet up)
7) My daughter had helped me sign up to “Net Flix” the day before.
8) All pain had stopped by the afternoon and I never needed the strong pain killers the doctor prescribed.
9) The egg sized swelling on my ankle bone had completely vanished when I took the boot off to go to sleep.
10) It seems even when something bad happens God still takes amazing care of me!

Sharing the joy!

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I seldom share things from my family’s personal life but this one is too good. I have to share it with you all.

A week or so ago a large pile of crates fell on my son in laws right hand while working. Miraculously only the top section of his ring finger was crushed but that was almost severed. Though they sewed it back on and put it in a cast the doctor told him it was highly unlikely he’d keep that part of his finger. We asked a couple of our friends and our best family prayer warriors to pray for him.

The cast just came off and the doctor couldn’t believe his eyes. He said he’d never seen healing like that and if he didn’t know better he’d think it was not the same finger! Needless to say he’ll not be loosing any of it. Praise be to God!

Not only that, but he and my daughter have been through some very rough times in the past few years. This miraculous healing is also a great encouragement to him of Jesus personal love and concern for him as an individual. I’m so happy for them!

 

Things we take for granted.

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wrist

I’m learning a lesson along these lines due to a problem with my wrist. I don’t know what’s wrong with it (neither does the doc.) but as of yesterday for no apparent reason I can’t put any weight on it or carry even the lightest thing, though it has near perfect mobility.

It’d seem no major problem to “rest it up and see how it goes” as the doc. said, after all I do have two hands. The truth is it’s far from easy, from riding my bike (I never realized till now I lean on my left handle bar when pushing off) to trying unsuccessfully to put on a pillow case (it requires coordination of both hands). I’m finding tons of little everyday tasks have now become difficult and have been ordered not to do any more gardening or allotment work for the next few days (a great frustration as my little seedlings are winking at me) as it will aggravate it. (Hmmm I wonder if the doc included typing – surely not!?)

OK, my sweet left wrist, I am truly sorry for taking you so much for granted. I promise if you’ll just go back to normal I’ll remember just how precious you are!

Ready. (written for a flash fiction competition on a theme of “Before the Gates”.)

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evacuation

“I’m not ready for this!” he yelled, as they rushed him through the field hospital. No one answered, just the syringe spraying its fountain of analgesic before plunging into his arm. They were taking off his leg for Christ’s sake! Strong hands held him down as he sank into darkness…

Light pervaded his eyes, as blinking, he re-emerged into consciousness. Panic surged. Grasping frantically joy erupted. It was there, solid flesh, without searing pain – the anesthetic? The strange thing was he was in his army fatigues and this was no hospital!

Before him stood monumental gates their scrolled iron work giving clear view. He watched as people thronged past. His side seemed strangely empty unbearably lonely, but within life thronged in happy abandon. He grasped at the iron work but a chain held it in place against him. He yelled to let him in, but they shook their heads smiling.

A familiar face wended through the throng.

“Dad!” Father smiled knowing his appearance heralded understanding. It hit Sam like a thunderbolt. Dad reached through the railing.

“It’s OK Sam, you’re not locked out forever, it’s just not your time yet.

“But… “

“It’s the anaesthetic, an allergic reaction, but they’re fighting for you. If they fail the gate will open. You’ll have your leg here,” he nodded down at the sound limb, no longer a shattered mess of blood and bone.”

“But what about Jan and the kids?”

“You’ll have to wait till they come…” The gate quivered, but he no longer wanted entry, he wanted Jan, to hold the boys in his arms, be there as they grew up…

Darkness enshrouded him once more, all faded to nothingness.

Harsh hospital lights invaded his eyes. The leg was no longer there. It didn’t matter, he told himself, it would be waiting. For now Jan and the boys were more important.