companionship.

Standard

It’s a cozy “armchair” feeling I have with Him and me,

Like a pair of bedroom slippers warm and comfy as can be.

A very special feeling to be loved for me alone,

To set down lists and doings, put down the mobile phone

And bask within His presence as He gently strokes my hair

Although I’m all alone here I feel his being there.

Like soothing cups of chocolate, like sunshine in the rain

This special deep contentment that eases all the pain.

 

Evening reflections.

Standard

Tiny floating blossoms punctuate cool, blue water as I swim deliciously in the sky pool.
Towering sentinels far above catch the patterns of the declining sun.
Music echoes softly from bars and eating places cuddled below.
Sharp winged birds fly and swoop.
Towering black thunder clouds battle the sun, clues of what was once here.
Nature held at bay like the monkey leaping, its tiny offspring hanging below, for its leafy refuge at the guards approach, nature yet magnificent in her glory.
Europe dissipates amidst bright colours and resounding drums, vivid and resplendent.
Here in the quiet of the pool at days end, life pauses, suffused in blue sparkling water, soothing, calming the heat of the day.
The spirit imbibes.

Full of the joys of spring (in autumn?)

Standard

Yes, I’m a happy bunny! After months of waiting, referrals etc. I finally got to see a specialist who could give me a clear diagnosis of the pains I’ve been having for the last year or so in my left thigh. Not only that but the cure is great!
It seems the nerve has become inflamed, causing the muscle to contract to protect it. The cure he prescribed?
1)Yoga, which I already found tends to ease it. He loved that I was doing that as apparently it’s the best thing,gently stretching the muscle while it relaxes the nerves.
2)Taking a walk around break every 20 mins while sitting (OK not great for my writing but still pleasant)
3)Chilling, relaxing and avoiding stress. He explained the mind and nerves are closely related so a chilled mind relaxes the nerve so it can heal(just how good can it get?)
He was very good at explaining and took time to do so, explaining why the former ultrasound treatment would have irritated it (you don’t want to overstimulate a nerve!!!) He’d also studied acupuncture and holistic medicine (unusual for an NHS doctor)and was happy I didn’t feel I needed any medication(The pain isn’t bad.)
He left me feeling great.I had been concerned not knowing what was causing it, especially when it got a lot worse after “treatment” So I’m celebrating – relieved to know it’s very minor, and I can sure live with the cure! lol!

Floating?

Standard

Life is like swimming, there has to be some movement on a constant basis to keep your head above water. If you go to sleep you sink. If you’re able to relax and float the effort can be very little, but if you want to get somewhere or achieve something it takes more. If you’re constantly driving both arms and legs you pretty soon get tired, so the best is periods of focused effort and periods of rest when you mostly float. That’s how channel swimmers make the 28 miles. If you are in for the long haul you need both,
It seems a somewhat lost art in these days, when everything races top speed, to stop and feel at peace within, to float on life’s waters. I’m as guilty as the next, (bringing up seven kids you become an expert at multi-tasking)it becomes a habit. I still find it very hard to just eat, for example, I always have a book propped, hold a conversation, or watch a movie, so I miss out on enjoying much of the flavor.
I have to force myself to stop and take time alone just to “be”, “to chill”, to “meditate”, to “pray and talk to God”. Whichever way you view this, this floating is the remedy to burn out, the elixir balm to promote mental wellness. It’s when we stop, and remember who we are and where we are going.

Life is like swimming.

Standard

One of the keys to swimming is to learn to float, then, instead of using your energy to keep your head above water you can channel it into getting somewhere.
I’ve always felt it strange that after someone drowns their body floats to the surface (face down not being the optimum position for survival, but none the less it floats.) I picked up on my mum’s fear of water as a child and this realisation helped me in my determination to learn to swim – I realised we are made to float not sink.
Life is much the same. Sometimes our frantic fight to stay afloat can be the very thing hindering us. Even worse, sometimes in our panic that we are drowning we can pull under those beloved “lifeguards” who are trying to rescue us.

So how can we learn to float?
I’d suggest,recognise it’s our natural condition to float. Sometimes huge “waves” come at us and we find ourselves submerged. Try not to panic, like the cork we have a tendency to bob back up to the surface after a minute or two. It may not be pleasant but the more we struggle the worse it tends to get. I look back to my childhood in the 50s surrounded by all those post war London folks, if anyone was an example of the “cork” those people were!
The second thing is to understand that the water/life can support you. Though sometimes it can get a bit rough, it is not “the enemy!”
Having faith in something other than yourself can be a great help. It’s easy to lay back in the arms of someone you love and trust. The poem “Footsteps in the Sand” is a good illustration. Looking over the footprints of his life a man berates Christ that at the hardest times he was left alone. Christ answers softly, “You were not alone, those footprints are mine. I was carrying you.” Guess that explains my personal “floating technique”. Do you have one too?

Coma. (blog bite of short fantasy story)

Standard

needle

Alex awoke to morning sunlight dazzling his eyes. He moved to sit up. Then he remembered…The dreams were becoming more real than his “reality”. He waited passively in his unresponsive body for the all-important shot that would reunite him with his fantasy utopia.

It came, the beaming smile, eye contact, and the prick of the needle. His eyes closed in expectancy, opening to focus on a white stone fountain, fresh sparkling water, a small town square reminding him of southern Italian piazzas…

A cool breeze ruffled his shirt. Villagers sat around white, ironwork tables drinking wine, chatting, feet outstretched in the evening sunshine.  A weathered old man, foot resting on a rattan chair, coaxed music from an ancient fiddle for a group of young dancers. More people were coming together having finished work for the day.

There was a feeling of balance, no one tired or exhausted, the intense need prevalent in Alex past life to “party” as an antidote to work or stress (as if enjoyment must be crammed in) seemed entirely missing.

Alex looked around for his guide. Doc was close by, answering the unspoken questions as if it were the most natural thing in the world.

“Most do this every night, or most nights,” He informed Alex. “Someone is always here and they enjoy this time together.”

It seemed quite family orientated, with quite a few old folks, mostly sitting at the tables or playing instruments. Children dashed between the groups playing games, some intent on an occupation similar to jacks, squatting on the ground, there were even a few dogs milling in the crowd. Younger folks were mostly dancing and talking.

“Not everyone is here,” Doc explained. “Some young couples for example prefer to walk alone, or enjoy the moonlight and stars.” He chuckled.

There was an overall feeling of peace and tranquility, song and laughter; no one seemed to be intense. Alex noted the old man that played had the fiddle dancing with a young woman and a strapping looking youngster with a little girl standing on his feet to dance. No one putting on a show, everyone included.

There were lampposts set about the square lighting the tables and illuminating the fountain, making the water sparkle. Some folks sat on its edge, a young girl splashing her companion, he laughed as it ended in a kiss. They all suddenly turned to acknowledge and wave to Alex, a wave of farewell. Was it time to go?

“No Doc, no! Not yet! I don’t want to go!” Alex pleaded, but the wave of darkness invaded none the less.

Am I Time Obsessed?

Standard

from September 2004

Song Bird Songs

Image0636

Me? I wouldn’t have thought so, but today my grandson and I took a longer ride to school going along the cycle path between the lakes rather than our usual back road route. It added a quarter mile and five minutes to our ride, but what a difference!
I took in the blue of the sky (I was free to look instead of anxiously watching traffic for two). On one side an immensity of green enclosed the wood land on the other the lake lay cool and calm as if drawing my heart out of dusty confinement.
My grandson’s usual grumbles that he was “too tired, hadn’t slept well, etc.” transformed into calls of “Gran look at that duck all curled in a ball” or “oooh what a cutie!” as a myriad of dogs sauntered by happily enjoying an early morning stroll. People smiled and said hello instead of frowning.

View original post 155 more words